Blue Ridge Labradoodles

FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

 

Q: What do you feed your dogs/puppies? 
A: This is a very important question and we are very convinced of a grain-free, allergy friendly diet. You can read all about the food we use and highly recommend here: Click here to read a full answer.

Q: Do Australian Labradoodles shed?
A: Most Australian Labradoodles have little to no shedding. The main factor in raising puppies that have non-shedding coats is having breeding stock that does not carry the improper coat gene (IC). Our dogs have been tested and do not pass on this shedding gene. 

Q: How big do your dogs get?
A: Our dogs range in size from 15 lb to 35 lb and depending on the parents of the litters, your puppy should not grow larger than this. 

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Q: Is there a difference between a Labradoodle and an Australian Labradoodle?
A: YES! This question is beautifully answered by the Australian Labradoodle Club of America. Click here to read a full answer.

Q: How many breeding dogs do you own and where do they live?
A: We believe that owning dogs is a privilege and not something to be overdone to raise money. Therefore we only have two, sometimes three, dogs living in our home. The other dogs that you see on our parents' pages are in our breeding program but live full time in a Guardian Family. This ensures that our dogs always receive plenty of individualized attention and are never neglected and that we do NOT run a kennel. 

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Q: Where are your puppies raised and how many litters do you have at a time?
A: All our puppies are raised in a warm and loving home setting. We have a room devoted only to our puppies that is right off of the main room of our house. They are with us 24/7 and when they go outside it is right under our watchful eye in our backyard. We only keep a maximum of 3 litters at a time. If we have more than two on our website then we have the other at our hired Guardian Family to care for them while they grow. 

Q: What age do you allow your puppies to go home?
A: At 8 to 9 weeks your puppy is ready to be picked up or flown home. We offer training that starts at this time, and we have many delivery options for your convenience. 

Q: Do you have a spay/neuter requirement?
A: Yes, your puppy must be spayed or neutered by 6 months of age in order to receive registration and have papers for your puppy. 

Q: What are the prices, colors and sizes of your puppies?
A: This is described in full detail on our Prices/Sizes/Colors page of our website.

Q: Do you ship? What is the cost?
A: Yes, we do ship. The cost is $400 in the US for puppies to fly alone. We also offer an exclusive option for our trainer to personally accompany your puppy on the flight for an additional $800+, depending on flight cost. Please ask for details. Also please note that puppies cannot fly to certain areas during certain times of the year due to weather restrictions. 

Q: What is your waiting list policy?
A: A $400 deposit holds your place on a particular litter's waiting list (one litter). When the puppies are 6-7 weeks of age, we allow people to choose their puppy in the order the deposits were received. It is at this age that we can tell much more about their temperament, coat, and future size, so it is the optimal time to choose which puppy will be forever yours. The deposit is non-refundable. 

Q: Can we come and meet your adult dogs and the puppies?
A: We do allow people on the waiting list (with a deposit) to come and meet the puppies after they have had their shots at 6-7 weeks of age via appointment. We will meet you at a designated end of our home so as to prevent any spreading of parvo-virus near where we raise our puppies before they can be fully vaccinated. You can meet the parents of your litter of puppies if you have arranged so with us beforehand. Sometimes one or both of the parents will be unavailable if he/she resides in a Guardian Home. We are happy to show off our happy, healthy parents!

Q: Male vs. female; what are the differences?
A: The answer is—the ONLY time gender truly matters is if you plan to breed your dog. Choosing the best puppy for your family does not have to do with gender; it has to do with the puppy’s individual personality and temperament. Males and females both can be independent, stubborn, and territorial. They can both develop unwanted behaviors if not trained properly. We do our best to assure that our puppies have been trained not to be overly aggressive or territorial. We do not allow the puppies to bite us, even in play. The main influence, however, will be what takes place when the puppy joins your family. The first year is absolutely essential for proper training. I would advise you to take your new puppy to an obedience training class. Be consistent with your new puppy, and do not allow any bad behavior to develop, even if it seems “cute” at the time. If a dog is trained properly, he or she should be affectionate, attentive, and eager to please. Some are more playful, and some are cuddlier—this depends on personality and temperament. There are low energy dogs and high energy dogs, and everything in between. These personalities start to show around 4-6 weeks of age. We play with our puppies, so we are able to tell what type of personality each puppy has. We will do our best to match up the puppy that is best for you based on personality and temperament. -Jeana Bigelow